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Victim Care

Restorative justice seeks to meet the needs of both victims and offenders. These articles discuss practice issues and working with victims.

yes
I agree that there is substantial need to shift the response to harm in our churches from denial, defensiveness and blaming to genuine engagement, openness [...]
clergy abuse & restorative justice
Thank you, Dale, for your comments. I think that would be a great way for Catholics to express their support for restorative justice. And as [...]
Response to Lisa Rea's Article
I wholeheartedly support the use of restorative justice in helping to heal the abuse issues in the Catholic Church. I've seen it work miracles before, [...]
Clergy sexual abuse: A cry for restorative justice
by Lisa Rea: At this hour, I would guess that some around the world are weary of the news stories of abuse that have rocked the Catholic Church in recent weeks. But to me, it's a reminder of how far we have to go to heal the injuries suffered by the victims (survivors) of abuse.
legislators need to hear from victims who support restorative justice
Hello, Judy. I agree with you to a point. You are right that legislators often look at the bottom line first (i.e. the cost) when [...]
Victiim Rights
It seems to me that members of the Virginia General Assembly will allow RJ practices in prison only if the practice offers a guarantee to [...]
More kumbaya, fewer criminals?
from Heather Horn's post on Atlantic Wire: Do criminals just need to talk and get some perspective? Yes, the idea seems fluffy, but it looks like some types of talk actually work. "Restorative justice"--in which convicted criminals actually meet their victims--is rapidly gaining ground in the UK. In one case recounted by Libby Brooks in the Guardian, the victim of a violent burglary wound up shouting at his attacker, telling him "he had crushed every belief [the victim] had that [he] could handle [himself] and protect [his] family." For the attacker, "this was the moment his perspective shifted irrevocably." Despite a history of criminality, he has not reoffended in the past eight years, and is in fact working as a "restorative conference facilitator."
Mugging victim Zoe Harrison 'helped to recover' by meeting her attacker Aaron Burns via restorative justice
from Nick Harding's article in The Mirror: When Zoe Harrison first came across Aaron Burns he held a knife to her throat and battered her so brutally he was spattered in her blood. The last time Zoe, 26, came face to face with her mugger, she left him sobbing for forgiveness. This is the power of restorative justice - making criminals say sorry to victims.
Death row lets victims' families down
from Jessica Reed's article in guardian.co.uk: Most debates about the criminal justice system and restorative justice are criticised for not focusing enough on the impact that violence has on victims and their families. Those objections multiply tenfold when the issue at hand is capital punishment: bring up the subject and many death penalty supporters will say that executions are the only way to meet survivors' needs for justice and closure, and that to oppose capital punishment is to be anti-victim. "What if it was your own son or mother?" they ask. "Wouldn't you want the perpetrator die at the hands of our justice system?" As it turns out, the truth is rather different. During last week's fourth world congress against death penalty in Geneva, the voices of murder victims' families painted a picture seldom seen in the media. For a variety of reasons, a growing number of families do not support capital punishment. However, all families face decades of legal appeals over the execution of the perpetrator – a truly agonising wait for anyone seeking closure.
Civil Authority & Moral Authority
In my view, the "justice system" and civil authority should be a facilitator of justice. Civil authority has the unique responsibility to restrain offenders by [...]
Crime vitims rights
I firmly believe, if the victim wishes, be alloowed to see, meet and question her attacker. I support this Bill.
Restorative justice a basic right
I concur with Texas, that it is a basic human right for victims to meet with their offenders in the presence of a SKILLED facilitator [...]
Giving crime victims the right to meet with their offenders: Virginia legislative developments
by Lisa Rea Should a crime victim have a right to meet his/her offender? It is very good to see that the Virginia State Legislature is considering the benefits that come with victim offender dialogue and restorative justice programming in general. According to Associated Press reporter Dena Potter's article in the Washington Examiner the proposed legislation is HB 913, authored by Delegate Robert B. Bell in the Virginia Legislature.
Giving crime victims the right to meet with their offenders: Virginia legislative developments
by Lisa Rea Should a crime victim have a right to meet his/her offender? It is very good to see that the Virginia State Legislature is considering the benefits that come with victim offender dialogue and restorative justice programming in general. According to Associated Press reporter Dena Potter's article in the Washington Examiner the proposed legislation is HB 913, authored by Delegate Robert B. Bell in the Virginia Legislature.
Trust the process
Thank you Kris! I needed this just now. You never know when you may have an injured soul come to a circle. My classroom circles [...]
As restorative justice practitioners, hard work needed regarding victims: Five things to do
from Kris Miner's blog Restorative Justice and Circles: I want to offer some lessons for people who do restorative justice. These lessons are for working with victims in either a victim-offender dialogue or a talking circle. I think its important to keep up our compassion towards victims skills. To really do our best, I have 5 things to work really hard at:
The Opportunity is a gift
As I read the title of this post (and then the rest of it) I thought about one of the first restorative conferences that I [...]
Restorative justice offers an opportunity, not a guarantee, for healing
from Lorenn Walker's blog: “Not everyone’s wounds will heal” after being victimized by crime, an experienced judge says. This is true. Some people will never heal. Restorative justice is not a panacea that will heal every single person’s wounds suffered from being a crime victim. Restorative justice offers only the opportunity for healing, not a guarantee, but we know from an abundance of research that restorative justice helps many people.
closure' myth
i cant imagine face the person who abuse you and asking him why i might do something very bad like murder if that happen to [...]
restorative justice from a survivor's perspective
As a survivor of a violent crime, I am a firm believer in the power of restorative justice programs to transform both the victim and [...]

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