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Violent Crimes

Restorative justice and victims and perpetrators of violent crime

gun violence & restorative justice
Thank you for your comments. I cannot speak for Nick and Amanda Wilcox whose daughter, Laura, was killed by a mentally ill man but I [...]
Laura's Law
Lisa and others, as a current student of Criminal Justice it has been my belief all along that our justice system has left behind the [...]
Denver woman feels the power of restorative justice after son murdered
from the article by Kevin Simpson in the Denver Post: ....When legislation last year cleared the way for a pilot program in restorative justice with the Colorado Department of Corrections, Evans — who had testified on behalf of the measure — embraced the opportunity to go first. She and her older son Calvin Hurd, who was 6 when gunshots peppered the car where he sat sleeping with his brother, began more than six months of preparation for a direct dialogue with Johnson. Part of that involved revisiting the crime. Evans had driven with her two children to a northeast Denver duplex to pick up her grandniece because there had been a drive-by there the previous night. She left her sons in the car.
Ted Wachtel on Nils Christie's plenary at European Forum
from Restorative Practices Blog: Today I attended the first day of the European Forum for Restorative Justice Conference that’s being held in Helsinki, Finland. It was nice to hear Nils Christie give a plenary speech. Nils Christie is now an 84-year-old emeritus professor from Norway whose famous article, “Conflict As Property,” defined the whole idea that governments and courts and lawyers steal our conflicts, and that we should have a right and an opportunity to resolve our own conflicts.
Wife of SO
I used to work hard with the systems to place SOs in prison, until I married my second husband and he turned himself in for [...]
Judge hits out at 'this kind of crap' as teen convicted of delivery man robbery
from the article in the Irish Examiner: A judge has told a Tallaght teenager who stole a Chinese takeaway that “this kind of crap” puts delivery men off doing their jobs. “On the face of it to some this may seem a minor crime, property to the value of €18,” Judge Mary Ellen Ring told 19-year-old Daniel Wall, “but this delivery man, Mr Yang Yu, provides an excellent service, bringing food to people’s doors.” “The kind of crap you engaged in puts people like Mr Yu off doing their work, they stop delivering and lose their business,” Judge Ring said as Wall nodded in agreement.
NCHERM-CR announces summit on the application of restorative justice practices to cases of campus sexual misconduct
from the press release of the National Center for Higher Education Risk Management The NCHERM-CR, the Conflict Resolution Practice Group of The National Center for Higher Education Risk Management ( www.ncherm.org ), will be hosting a two-day invitational Summit on the use of restorative justice practices in student-on-student sexual misconduct cases. This Summit is being convened to explore ways in which forms of conflict resolution, and especially restorative justice practices, may be utilized lawfully, productively and beneficially to improve on the traditional approaches used in student disciplinary proceedings.
The moral question
from the article by Kent Spencer in The Province: ....Elliott proposes a comparatively low-tech, low-cost method for dealing with the vast majority of offenders. It involves public apologies and community service in a concept known as restorative justice - meaning literally to restore the community to what it was. He has offered to bring confessed wrongdoers to a place where they can meet with people who suffered trauma at the hands of roving thugs.
Who are you? Karen Lang
from Alicia Hanson's article on abc.net.au: "Imagine you are shopping at Garden City - you are trying to find an appropriate jumper for your daughter. It has to have a high neck. Something that will compliment her blonde hair and fair skin. You know she would want to look her best. Finally you find a soft mauve high neck jumper, you know it will look beautiful on her. You clutch your purchase and contain yourself till you reach your car - where you break into sobs. The jumper is for your daughter to wear in the casket - there will be a viewing and the high neck is to cover her wounds. You will never shop at Garden City again without thinking of her. Imagine." - Karen Lang
There’s hope even for sex offenders
from Chris Dornin's article in Corrections.com: ....So we register sex offenders as surrogate terrorists and post their personal information as if it were bin Laden’s bio on the Internet for everyone to see. Failure to report to police on a quarterly basis earns a sex offender a new felony charge. We ban them from living near schools, daycare centers and school bus stops with draconian penalties for violations. We civilly commit them when they finish their prison terms. We make sure those are long sentences by stacking charges in multiple consecutive bids. Each image of child on hard drive becomes a separate felony. We give sex offenders special license plates. The police notify the neighbors when a sex offender moves in nearby. The neighbors evict them, or force the landlords to do it for them, sometimes subtly, sometimes with raw violence.
Restoring a sense of justice in broken communities
from Stephen Moffatt's entry on Open Democracy's 50.50: Last summer major cities in the UK saw serious urban unrest for the first time in a generation. The underlying causes, reasons for the rapid escalation and reaction of public services to the unrest have been the subject of several studies, notably Reading the Riots ↑ and the Independent Riots Communities and Victims Panel ↑ , whose work continues. The evidence that emerged has already established a clear link between deprivation and rioting, a fact acknowledged by the Independent Riots Panel in their interim report.
How restorative justice can empower victims in serious crimes - two cases of rape
from the post by Jonathan Bartley in Ekklesia: A frequently repeated myth about restorative justice is that it can’t work for “serious” or “violent crimes”. As restorative practices become more widely available however, this myth is being busted. Its role in shifting the power imbalance around crime towards the victim is becoming increasingly apparent. Its ability to help victims overcome the fear of crime and move on, in a way that more punitive practices often don't, is also being appreciated. Two examples that have been cited recently involve cases of rape.
A restorative circle in the wake of a police shooting
from the article by Andrea Brenneke in Tikkun: ....In the weeks after the shooting, members of the Williams family reported strained interactions with members of the police department, including increased scrutiny and harassment by bicycle patrol officers where they worked and sold their art at the Pike Place Market. Tensions were building. Something had to be done to address the immediate needs for safety and improve the relationship between the family, the community, and the police department. ....There was no restorative justice system in place nor any prior experience with Restorative Circles, so I worked with Kathryn Olson to create a shared understanding of the process we would use to hold this circle. We modified aspects of the Restorative Circle process to address the unusual circumstances. I was able to hold pre-circle meetings with the family members, friends, and community members, but it was not possible for me to meet in advance with most of the police department participants. Instead, I worked with Ms. Olson and provided her written summaries of the Restorative Circles process to share with the other participants in the Seattle Police Department. In all of this, I aimed to stay true to restorative principles and be flexible with the form of how the process unfolded.
A restorative circle in the wake of a police shooting
from the article by Andrea Brenneke in Tikkun: ....In the weeks after the shooting, members of the Williams family reported strained interactions with members of the police department, including increased scrutiny and harassment by bicycle patrol officers where they worked and sold their art at the Pike Place Market. Tensions were building. Something had to be done to address the immediate needs for safety and improve the relationship between the family, the community, and the police department. ....There was no restorative justice system in place nor any prior experience with Restorative Circles, so I worked with Kathryn Olson to create a shared understanding of the process we would use to hold this circle. We modified aspects of the Restorative Circle process to address the unusual circumstances. I was able to hold pre-circle meetings with the family members, friends, and community members, but it was not possible for me to meet in advance with most of the police department participants. Instead, I worked with Ms. Olson and provided her written summaries of the Restorative Circles process to share with the other participants in the Seattle Police Department. In all of this, I aimed to stay true to restorative principles and be flexible with the form of how the process unfolded.
hmmm
@Laura All I know, is I believe in restorative justice with all my heart but as a survivor of childhood sexual assault and rape as [...]
Restorative justice approach to schoolboy assault
from the Nottinghamshire Police webpage: A new approach to resolving criminal matters has been used to deal with an assault on a Nottingham schoolboy. A 14-year-old pupil collapsed after he was assaulted in a classroom by a fellow schoolboy at the National Church of England Academy on 22 September 2011.
A restorative lens on violence
from Jennifer Haslett and Alan Edwards' article for Restorative Justice Week 2011: ....In our 14 years of working together on RJ cases involving violence, we have found that maintaining a focus on RJ as a justice process is fundamental in that it holds central the priorities of reparation of harm, accountability, safety and voice. Justice in this context is not synonymous with the criminal justice system; rather, justice as something people seek in societies and also as individuals on a daily basis, whether within families, workplaces or interactions within communities.
Response to Laura Leah's comment
I'm sorry but you are ignorant. I was sexually abused as a child, by a close relative, and although I forgave him, that does not [...]
Victims: never too late for restorative justice
Responding to Manny's comments, in my work with victims of violent crime I have learned that it is never too late for victims to take [...]
Victims
I believe RJ is the way but in this case I believe it would be hard for the victims to get closure or their needs [...]

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