Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

Hate Crime

Restorative justice and hate crime victims and perpetrators.

Gavrielides, Theo. Contextualizing restorative justice for hate crimes.
The application of restorative justice (RJ) with hate crime remains an underdeveloped field of research, policy, and practice. This article aims to advance the understanding of these two areas of inquiry: RJ and hate crime. It is known that while most hate incidents involve minor, punishable offenses, their impact can be long lasting and detrimental to victims and affected communities. The article investigates how RJ is conceptualized within the hate crime context. The findings are based on a 3-year research program, which combined theoretical analysis, literature review, and U.K.-focused field research that was carried out through a combination of qualitative methods. These included semistructured interviews with an expert sample of practitioners and policy makers as well as focus groups with young victims and offenders of hate incidents. Direct observation was also carried out with two RJ practices.
Judicial system fails in hate crime
from the article by Ian Gillespie in the London Free Press: ....How do you respond when you're targeted simply because you're you? That's a hate crime -- when someone is victimized because of their race, religion, ethnic origin, sexual orientation or physical and mental abilities. And while any crime is awful and traumatic for its victims, hate crimes are particularly repugnant because they're attacks against the essence of a person. That's why last week's court decision involving an attack upon a gay man is so lamentable.
Detroit Tigers' Delmon Young pleads guilty To Midtown aggravated harassment
by Jen Chung in Gothamist: Back in April, Detroit Tigers outfielder Delmon Young was arrested for allegedly striking a man outside a Midtown hotel—and he also allegedly uttered anti-Semitic remarks, prompting him to be charged with a hate crime. Today, Young has pleaded guilty to aggravated harassment in the second degree and will have to "complete 10 days of community service and participate in a mandatory restorative justice program at the Museum of Tolerance New York," according to the Manhattan DA's office.
Ten years is enough: Remembering the victims of hate crime violence
If we have learned anything over the past decade, it is that hate does not happen in a vacuum. In a polarized climate of “culture wars,” the differences and chasms between us overshadow what should bring us together to recognize our common humanity. In such a climate, even the measures intended to prevent hate crimes and address intolerance are politicized. The hate crimes bill that is moving its way through Congress seeks to improve the federal government's ability to enforce hate crimes laws with local law enforcement and has been named after Matthew Shepard, the gay University of Wyoming student who was brutally murdered in 1998. The bill includes protections for victims of bias based on sexual orientation, gender, gender expression, and disability.
Restorative justice must humble if it is to be judged a success
an editorial in the Derby Telegraph: There is little doubt that restorative justice makes sense. Certainly when it was first brought in, the suggestion that a victim of crime being handed immediate compensation by a perpetrator made sense.
Conceptualising and contextualising restorative justice for hate crimes
from the article by Theo Gavrielides on Crimsoc: Restorative justice (hereafter RJ) was (re) introduced to debates about justice in the 1970s at the start of a large volume of academic and policy-orientated discussions on its potential. Braithwaite, Christie, Sullivan and Zehr spoke about the transformative potential of the RJ paradigm and its ‘changing lenses’ on how we view crime. Barnett spoke first about a ‘paradigm shift’, claiming that we are living a “crisis of an old paradigm,” and that “this crisis can be restored by the adoption of a new paradigm of criminal justice”.
Bishop, Bill. 'Restorative justice' tests commitment
After the September 11 attacks, Tammam Adi was afraid of becoming a target because he was a Muslim. So when Paul Younce threatened him on the phone, he promptly filed charges. The two ended up going to mediation and after a shaky beginning, managed to resolve the situation in such a way that both sides felt satisfied.
Gavrielides, Theo. Contextualizing restorative justice for hate crime.
The application of restorative justice (RJ) with hate crime remains an underdeveloped field of research, policy, and practice. This article aims to advance the understanding of these two areas of inquiry: RJ and hate crime. It is known that while most hate incidents involve minor, punishable offenses, their impact can be long lasting and detrimental to victims and affected communities. The article investigates how RJ is conceptualized within the hate crime context. The findings are based on a 3-year research program, which combined theoretical analysis, literature review, and U.K.-focused field research that was carried out through a combination of qualitative methods. These included semistructured interviews with an expert sample of practitioners and policy makers as well as focus groups with young victims and offenders of hate incidents. Direct observation was also carried out with two RJ practices. (author's abstract)
Priest's slaying in Birmingham to be remembered in church service
from the article by Greg Garrison in the Birmingham News: The 1921 slaying of a Catholic priest in Birming­ham by a Methodist min­­ister will be the subject of repentance during a 6:30 p.m. Ash Wednesday service at Highlands United Methodist Church, 1045 20th Street South, led by United Methodist Bishop William Willimon. "It's going to be a power­ful and a historic event," said Jim Pinto, director of the Father James E. Coyle Memorial Project. "We're not going to live in the past, but we want to more fully understand the past."
Celebrity chef backs new Scottish Police hate crime scheme
from the news release by Lothian and Borders Police: Celebrity chef Tony Singh is backing Lothian and Borders Police pioneering new scheme for tackling Juvenile Hate Crime. The Edinburgh based TV regular launched the scheme with Deputy Chief Constable Steve Allen, and LGBT Youth Scotland’s Schools Development Manager, Cara Spence, at LGBT Youth Scotland, Leith, on Monday 12th December.
Racist attack on bus: Offender's Youth Justice Conference
from the article by Lisa Robinson in The Sydney Morning Herald: A teenager involved in an anti-Semitic attack on a bus full of young Jewish students will visit the Sydney Jewish Museum as part of an agreed settlement with NSW police and the Jewish community. The teenager attended a youth justice conference on Waverley Council Library on Tuesday, where he faced one of his victims and her family. As well as touring the Sydney Jewish Museum, the youth will also enrol in a school harmony project run by the NSW Jewish Board of Deputies.
Vos, Betty and Umbreit, Mark S and Coates, Robert B. Community Peacemaking Project: Responding to Hate Crimes, Hate Incidents, Intolerance, and Violence Through Restorative justice Dialogue.
In this report, the authors describe the first year of a two year project by the Center for Restorative Justice and Peacemaking on the use of community restorative dialogue as a response to hate. The purpose of the project is to promote community reconciliation through the identification of new responses – particularly the use of dialogue consistent with restorative justice principles – to hate crimes, hate incidents, intolerance, and violence. The initial task in the first year of the project was to identify and document community cases in which restorative dialogue formed part of a community’s response to hate incidents. Research into particular cases involved in-depth interviews with facilitators and mediators and analysis of newspaper articles and web sites. The report itself consists of the following: case study descriptions; case analysis and implications for restorative dialogue in response to hate crimes; responding to hate through restorative dialogue; and projections about the next phase of the project.
Shenk, Alyssa. Victim-Offender Mediation: The Road to Repairing Hate Crime Injustice
Abstract unavailable
Shenk, Alyssa. Victim-Offender Mediation: The Road to Repairing Hate Crime Injustice.
Shenk begins this essay with the observation that historically the American criminal justice system – retributive in character, and focused on crime as a violation of law – has ignored the needs of the victim of crime and failed to restore the victim’s losses. In recent years there has been a trend to bring the needs of the victim to the forefront of the justice system. This, Shenk remarks, is symbolic of a shift toward restorative justice with the focus on the needs of victims. Victim-offender mediation has emerged as the best-known and effective means of practicing restorative justice, yet it has largely been limited to property crimes and minor assaults. Recently, there has been some development to employ victim-offender mediation to more severe, violent crimes. With all of this in view, Shenk contends for the expansion of restorative justice, and specifically the use of victim-offender mediation, to address hate crimes.
Growing past hate: 'Restorative justice' helps heal pain from teens' vandalism
from the article by Fred Van Liew in the DesMoines Register: In March of 1994 members of the Temple B’nai Jeshurun in Des Moines awoke to find neo-Nazi graffiti scrawled on the side of their synagogue. There were no immediate suspects, but there was anguish, anger and outrage.
Coates, Robert B. and Umbreit, Mark S. and Vos, Betty. Responding to Hate Crimes Through Restorative Justice Dialogue.
Hate promotes violence. Dialogue among conflicting parties and groups is one way to decrease hate and help prevent bias-motivated crimes. Restorative justice has emerged in the last three decades as a means of giving all who are stakeholders in a crime – victims, offenders, and the community to which they belong – a voice in how harm can be repaired and future harm prevented. The present article reports on a two-year study of seven communities that utilized elements of a restorative justice dialogue approach as one component of responding to bias-motivated crimes and hate-charged situations. Following presentation of three case studies, the article highlights the invitational nature of such dialogue, the preparation of participants, and the dialogue process. It also examines factors that influence the dialogue, including the intense impact of hate crimes, the role of the media, and the involvement of outside interest groups. Finally, it explores ways to sustain the dialogue after the crisis recedes. (authors’ abstract)
Strobl, Staci and Volpe, Maria R.. Restorative justice responses to post-September 11 hate crimes: Potential and challenges.
This article focuses on the extent to which victim-offender mediation was utilized by restorative justice practitioners in response to anti-Arab and anti-Muslim harassment and other September 11-related hate crimes. Specific attention was given to the disparity between the advocacy for victim-offender mediation in these incidents and its actual use, and the lessons to be learned from restorative justice efforts after September 11. (author's abstract)
Correctional Service of Canada. Youth Restorative Action Project (YRAP), Edmonton, Alberta
The Youth Restorative Action Project (YRAP) of Edmonton, Alberta, is a justice committee focusing on addressing problems from hate crimes, as well as crimes connected with child prostitution, mental illness, and substance abuse. YRAP was inspired by teenager Jasmina Sumanac. Moving to Canada from Serbia, she was struck by the need to combat hate, racism, and other issues not only in Serbia but also in Canada. Collaborating with her Youth Worker, Mark Cherrington, she and Mark initiated YRAP. As described in this resource paper, YRAP receives referrals from youth courts. Members of YARP meet in a restorative conference with all stakeholders in the problem to deal with the offense and its consequences. YRAP has gained significant recognition, and it is now beginning to expand to Toronto and other areas.
Wessler, Stephen L. Hate Crimes and Bias-Motivated Harassment on Campus
A number of states and the federal government in the United States have adopted hate crime statutes in the last decade or so. While there are various ways of stipulating what constitutes a hate crime in the statutes, notes Stephen Wessler, in general a hate crime can be defined as a criminal offense against a person or property where the offender is motivated by bias against another person’s race, religion, ethnic origin, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation. Institutions of higher education are not immune from the commission of hate crimes. In this chapter Wessler examines hate crimes in college and university settings. He examines types of hate crimes and their pervasiveness on campuses, bias-motivated harassment, and the impact of hate crimes and incidents of bias. This leads to his identification of effective responses to and prevention of such problems, with respect to both offenders and victims.
Merciful Jews forgive Nazi grave vandal
from the article by Tony Wall for stuff.co.nz: The Jewish community has taken pity on one of the youths who desecrated graves at a cemetery in Auckland with Nazi symbols - causing worldwide outrage - and is even offering to pay his university tuition fees so he can turn his life around. Robert Moulden, 19, pleaded guilty to a charge of intentional damage in the Auckland District Court last year and will be sentenced next month. His co-accused, Christian Landmark, 20, has pleaded not guilty and appears in court again on Tuesday. More than a dozen headstones in the Jewish quarter of the Symonds St Cemetery were vandalised with images of swastikas and expletive-ridden anti-Israeli messages on October 19. It is proving incredibly difficult to remove paint from the porous headstones, which date back to the 19th century, and the repair job could cost as much as $50,000.

Document Actions

Restorative Justice Online - Featured Video

Restorative Justice Library Search

Search 11427 publications on restorative justice