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David Daubney of Canada presented the 2011 International Prize for Restorative Justice
by Dan Van Ness David Daubney has been awarded the 2011 International Prize for Restorative Justice in recognition of the public policy leadership he has provided in support of restorative justice. The presentation was made during the Prison Fellowship World Convocation underway in Toronto, Canada from 28 June – 2 July, 2011. Daubney’s interest in restorative justice began twenty five years ago when he was a Member of Parliament, chairing the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice. The Committee was engaged in a year-long study of public and professional attitudes about crime and criminal justice. As it conducted hearings across Canada, its members began to hear about a concept that was new to all of them: restorative justice. They heard from grassroots organizations operating victim offender reconciliation programs in Canada and from crime victims who spoke about the personal healing they had received from their involvement in these programs. The Committee was so impressed that it recommended in its 1987 report “Taking Responsibility” – known to many as the Daubney Report – that restorative values and principles be incorporated into the Canadian Criminal Code.
Tougher legislation needed on hate crimes
from Kristopher Wells and Murray Billett's article in the Edmonton Journal: ....Here in Canada, the gravity of hate crimes was officially recognized in 1970, when the government amended the Criminal Code to include hate propaganda as a punishable offence. In 1996, the government also introduced enhanced sentencing provisions for offences motivated by hate, and in 2001 included mischief to religious property as a specific hate-motivated offence. Despite this evolution, we argue that these legislative responses to hate have not gone far enough. The problem most concerning to many diverse communities and law enforcement officials involves the fact that there are still no direct provisions in the Criminal Code to identify hate crime as a violent offence (such as assault) or as a crime against a person or individual property (such as vandalism).
Saskatchewan Justice. Use of Adult Alternative Measures in Saskatchewan: 1999-2000 and 2000-2001. Appendices: Alternative Measures Policies
Over the past several years, many agencies and justice organizations have developed alternative measures programs as a way of dealing with conflict. As a result, both the federal and provincial governments have developed policies and guidelines regarding the use of alternative measures and the development of alternative measures programs. This booklet introduces the concept of alternative measures and provides the legislation and policies that govern the use of alternative measures in Saskatchewan. (excerpt)
Government of Saskatchewan. Community Justice Programs Regulations
This piece of legislation details regulations for community justice programs. These include family violence education, aboriginal court worker program, community capacity building, and victim-offender mediation (a restorative justice program). Generally, these programs, specifically victim-offender mediation, help to reduce the risk of re-victimization. Regulations on application and financial need for the programs are also discussed in the paper.
Canadian Legal Information Institute. The Community Justice Programs Regulations
This piece of legislation details regulations for community justice programs. These include family violence education, aboriginal court worker program, community capacity building, and victim-offender mediation (a restorative justice program). Generally, these programs, specifically victim-offender mediation, help to reduce the risk of re-victimization. Regulations on application and financial need for the programs are also discussed in the paper.
Canadian Legal Information Institute. Youth Criminal Justice Act - General Provisions
This legislation, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Section 7, describes community-based programs and their general provisions. The Attorney General of Canada or a “minister designated by the lieutenant governor in council of a provinceâ€? can establish community-based programs that provide alternatives to judicial proceedings. These may including victim-offender mediation and other mediation and restitution programs.
Solicitor General, Canada. Consolidated Report: Report on the Provisions and Operations of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act
This report provides information on the CCRA and related issues in order to support review of the legislation by a parliamentary committee. As such, this report is factual, presenting detailed information on legislative implementation, and perceived impacts and effects. The report has six sections. The first is the executive summary, followed by this brief introductory section. The third section provides a short history of corrections and conditional release in Canada. Section four situates the CCRA in context during its development and initial implementation. Key challenges and opportunities in the 1980s, and 1990s are outlined in this section. Section five provides detailed information on the provisions and operations of the CCRA from November 1992 to March 31, 1997. Information is also provided for the very limited experience with changes to the CCRA which were introduced through Bill C-55 in July 1997. The final section (six) provides brief concluding remarks. (excerpt)

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