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Showing 10 posts published between Jun 01, 2012 and Jun 30, 2012 [Show all]

Rena captain and officer sent to jail

from the article by Matt Bowne and Paloma Migone in the Marlborough Express:

....The men responsible for causing New Zealand's worst maritime environmental disaster by grounding the Rena off Tauranga's coast have been sentenced to seven months in jail.

...."There was substantial ecological damage to marine wildlife and seabirds, the food resources of the indigenous people who reside on the coast, the incomes of those whose living is made from the sea ... and an entire community was sent into shock."

Jun 29, 2012 , , , ,

Judge hits out at 'this kind of crap' as teen convicted of delivery man robbery

from the article in the Irish Examiner:

A judge has told a Tallaght teenager who stole a Chinese takeaway that “this kind of crap” puts delivery men off doing their jobs.

“On the face of it to some this may seem a minor crime, property to the value of €18,” Judge Mary Ellen Ring told 19-year-old Daniel Wall, “but this delivery man, Mr Yang Yu, provides an excellent service, bringing food to people’s doors.”

“The kind of crap you engaged in puts people like Mr Yu off doing their work, they stop delivering and lose their business,” Judge Ring said as Wall nodded in agreement.

Jun 28, 2012 , , , , ,

Why Iraq needs a court of truth and reconciliation now

from the article by Faris Harram in niqash:

Recently I read the arrest warrant that was issued against [Iraqi Vice President] Tariq al-Hashimi on Interpol’s website. It’s difficult to know whether the man is innocent or guilty and we will all have to wait until Iraqi courts issue a verdict. But reading the warrant made me think about the golden opportunity that Iraq after 2003, when the nation had the chance to really redress the cultural imbalances created during the rule of [former Iraqi leader] Saddam Hussein.  

When Hussein was caught and arrested very few Iraqis spoke out to suggest a reconciliation process. Such a process would have opened the door for Iraq’s elite - intellectuals, academics, sociologists, psychologists, economists and even clerics - to initiate a unique debate.

Jun 27, 2012 , ,

Power of One: Restorative justice couples victims with offenders

from the article on CTV.ca:

....A woman named Marité has been taking part in the process, not by facing her sexually-abusive father, but rather, another man who committed similar acts.

She said that results have helped her cope with the damage she suffered.

"For him it was like I was his daughter," said Marité. "And I was able also to express my anger to him and that's what he wanted rather than silence from his daughter."

"I can now go forward because I'm not bound to my father anymore. I can leave him go."

Jun 26, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

How to get ahead in ... youth offending services

from the article by Debbie Andalo in the Guardian:

The shape of the youth offending service is changing as it tackles deep spending cuts from both councils and the Youth Justice Board, its main sources of funding. Last year the annual grant paid to youth offending teams was slashed by almost 20%, and the board has just confirmed that another 7% will be shaved off this year's award.

Shrinking budgets have prompted teams across England to look at how they can deliver the same level of service with less money. They are coming up with different solutions.

In January, three West London boroughs – Hammersmith and Fulham, the City of Westminster, and Kensington and Chelsea – launched a tri-borough youth offending service. Each council still has its own dedicated team, but court services, restorative justice and business support are shared.

Jun 25, 2012 , ,

NCHERM-CR announces summit on the application of restorative justice practices to cases of campus sexual misconduct

from the press release of the National Center for Higher Education Risk Management:

The NCHERM-CR, the Conflict Resolution Practice Group of The National Center for Higher Education Risk Management ( www.ncherm.org ), will be hosting a two-day invitational Summit on the use of restorative justice practices in student-on-student sexual misconduct cases.

This Summit is being convened to explore ways in which forms of conflict resolution, and especially restorative justice practices, may be utilized lawfully, productively and beneficially to improve on the traditional approaches used in student disciplinary proceedings.

Jun 22, 2012 , , ,

Police hunt church arsonists, aged just six and nine

from the article by Tammy Hughes in the Mail:

A devastating arson attack carried out on a church was committed by two schoolchildren aged just six and nine. 

Religious books, a valuable alter cloth, carpets and fittings were all destroyed in the blaze amounting to £10,000 worth of damage.

It is thought that four small fires were started as an act of vandalism and that the children didn't expect for the blaze to get out of hand.

Jun 21, 2012 , , , , ,

Not adding up: Criminal reconciliation in Chinese juvenile justice

from the article in Dui Hua's Human Rights Journal:

Recent amendments to China’s Criminal Procedure Law involve special procedures for handling cases involving juvenile defendants and resolving cases through criminal reconciliation. Although the law does not explicitly link the two, criminal reconciliation has been a key feature in the development of China’s juvenile justice system under the principle of “education first, punishment second.”

Dui Hua welcomes criminal reconciliation as a means to restorative justice and reduced juvenile incarceration, but research suggests that the relatively new measure is experiencing some growing pains in China. Jiang Jue (姜珏), a PhD candidate in the School of Law at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has done extensive research on criminal reconciliation in China and has seen how the process works in many juvenile cases. Her research indicates that current implementation of criminal reconciliation falls short of juvenile justice principles by alienating youth and stifling attempts at education.

Jun 20, 2012 , , , , , ,

Can we have our ball back please? Teen arrested then released after Manchester City complaint

from the article by "Sportsmail REporter" in the Mail:

Manchester City officials called in police after a teenage fan made off with the title-winning ball in the club’s Premier League triumph.

The ball went missing in the melee that followed striker Sergio Aguero’s last-ditch winner against QPR last Sunday when fans streamed on to the pitch at the Etihad Stadium as the final whistle blew.

Jun 19, 2012 , , ,

For prisoners, hope and help behind bars and beyond

from the article by Dean Bucalos in the Courier Journal:

What has been missing in the panoply of services provided to ex-offenders is grassroots, community involvement. When people are released from prison, they have the promise of often questionable and impermanent housing. Most have no money or the security of employment. Often, they return to environments that were partially responsible for leading them to make poor choices and commit crimes.

Having faced this reality, those involved with our prison congregation have answered Russell’s question posed by Leonard Pitts, “What are we going to do to help him when he gets out?”

Jun 18, 2012 , , ,

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