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RJ Article Bargen, J. Critical View of Conferencing
A critique of two new criminal justice initiatives, sentencing circles in Canada and family group conferences in Australia, is presented. Sentencing circles in Canada involve a process whereby community members recommend the sentence in cases involving other members of the same community. Family group conferences in Australia allow persons directly affected by crime to actively participate in dealing with the consequences of crime. Both collective and individual accountability for offending behavior. Both initiatives are evaluated in terms of their implications for aboriginal and indigenous communities.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Baskin, Cyndy. Holistic Healing and Accountability: Indigenous Restorative Justice
Writing from an Aboriginal perspective in Canada, Cyndy Baskin draws certain fundamental contrasts between Western-European and Aboriginal approaches to understanding and dealing with wrongdoing. For example, a Western-European approach, as seen in the dominant society and its criminal justice system in Canada, focuses on the offender and his or her individual responsibility for wrongdoing, and emphasizes punishment of the offender as the most appropriate response. An Aboriginal approach emphasizes a collective responsibility for dealing with wrongdoing and seeks healing to restore peace and balance among the community, offender, and victim. In this framework, Baskin discusses her work with Aboriginal sexual offenders using culture-based restorative justice aims and processes, such as circles.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Boyes-Watson, Carolyn. Circle of Accountability: Being in Circle Outside of Circle.
Peacemaking circles are a method of communication and problem solving derived from aboriginal and native traditions. This summary highlights how circles are used at Roca—a multicultural, youth, family, and community development organization—to open up new possibilities for empowerment through learning how to be accountable to themselves and their community. (author's abstract).
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Boyes-Watson, Carolyn. Come Together: Building Community Through Circles
Peacemaking circles are a method of communication and problem solving derived from aboriginal and native traditions. This summary highlights how circles are used at Roca - a multi-cultural, youth, family and community development organization - to strengthen the bonds of community. (author's abstract)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Boyes-Watson, Carolyn. Discovering Their Voice: Empowering Young People Through Circles
Peacemaking circles are a method of communication and problem solving derived from aboriginal and native traditions. This summary highlights how circles are used at Roca—a multicultural, youth, family, and community development organization—to open up new possibilities for empowerment of young people through discovering their own voice. (author's abstract)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Boyes-Watson, Carolyn. Seeds of Change: Using Peacemaking Circles to Build a Village for Every Child
Roca, Inc., a grassroots human development and community organization, has adopted the peacemaking circle as a tool in its relationship building with youth, communities, and formal systems. Circles are a method of communication derived from aboriginal and native traditions. In Massachusetts, the Department of Social Services and the Department of Youth Services are exploring the application of the circle in programming with youth and families. By providing a consistent structure for open, democratic communication, peacemaking circles enhance the formation of positive relationships in families, communities, and systems. The outcome is a stronger community with greater unity across truly diverse participants. This article presents the theory and practice of peacemaking circles, the lessons and challenges of implementing circles in formal organizations, and the potential of the circle to support a strengths-based and community-based approach to child welfare. Author's abstract.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Brady, Kat and Sakai, Ted and Walker, Lorenn. Restorative Circles: A Solution-Focused Reentry Planning Process for Inmates
This article describes a pilot programme in Hawaii using restorative circles in creating transition plans for inmates.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Brown, Judy and Pranis, Kay. Using Peacemaking Circles in Family Violence: Hopes and Cautions
This session will explore the potential risks and benefits of using the peacemaking circle process to work with victims and offenders to address issues of family violence. Experienced advocates will share what they have learned in a pilot project initiated by a domestic violence agency in Cottage Grove, MN. The distinct challenges of family violence cases will be discussed along with limitations of the circle process. Presenters and participants will work to identify special practice requirements related to the use of this process in cases of family violence. Author's abstract
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Bushie, Burma. Community Holistic Circle Healing: A Community Approach
The author describes the work of healing circles (akin to community and family conferences) in a Native community in Canada to deal with cases of sexual abuse. She describes in detail the participants, principles, procedures, and desired objectives (e.g., accountability, healing, restitution, reconciliation) of a Community Holistic Circle Healing model involving offenders, victims, family members, community members and leaders, social services professionals, and government criminal justice officials (crown attorneys and judges). Community Holistic Circle Healing is providing a concrete alternative to the standard Canadian criminal justice process for dealing with offenses.
Located in articlesdb / articles
Calling a circle....
from John Gehm's entry on Restore: What does it mean when we say, “We’re calling a circle?” In the context of restorative practices I take it to mean that we are clearing a space where community can enter. It may or it may not choose to do so. But sitting in circle is the best we’ve got to silence the din and distraction of daily life and risk finding out that beneath whatever differences we may have on the surface we are connected deeply by what we have in common. Authentic community is rare and it is safe. It is the opposite of that place we mostly inhabit filled with masks, anxiety, invisibility, power and imbalance. Circles done well open a place for empathy, respect, empowerment, and direct communication for authentic ‘human being.’ Restorative circles are used for sentencing, for reconciliation, for healing, for celebration, for talking and for educating.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB