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Julie and Anthony’s story
from the Restorative Justice Council's Restorative justice in youth offending teams information pack: After Anthony, 15, lost his temper during a game of football and assaulted another boy, he was offered the chance to take part in a restorative justice conference. Here, Anthony and his mum Julie explain how it helped them to move on from the incident and deal with his behaviour. Anthony: I was playing football and there was a lad there called Ben*. He had come out with me and my friends a few times before but I didn't really know him well. During the game I thought that Ben had kicked me but he hadn't really done anything. I got really angry. I just lost it for no reason whatsoever. After the game as he was walking off I chased after him and as he turned around I hit him in the face and cut his eye open. After that I just ran home....
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
How restorative justice changed a grieving family’s opinion of a hit-and-run driver
from the article by Douglas Quan in Postmedia news: There was no ambiguity in how Coral Forslund felt when the man responsible for her sister’s hit-and-run death was finally sentenced to prison. She “hated him.”.... But nagged by lingering questions — namely, was he remorseful for what he did? — Forslund, of Langley, B.C., reached out to a little-known federal program called Restorative Opportunities that arranges meetings between victims and offenders after sentencing. During their session in a B.C. prison, the offender broke down and Forslund heard him say for the first time that he was sorry.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Hergo: 3 testimonies. Conferencing in Belgium
from the announcement on European Forum for Restorative Justice: In Belgium, Judges of the Juvenile Court can propose a Hergo as a response to serious crimes. During such a conference, the underage offender (and his parents) and the victim, both with their personal supporters, look for redress towards victim and society. The minor also plans what he intends to do to prevent recidivism. A police inspector is present at the meeting. A neutral facilitator has preparatory talks with all parties concerned. He chairs the conference. Afterwards, the Judge ratifies the plan for redress during a session of the Juvenile Court. Every year, about 100 minors and the same amount of victims receive a proposal for a Hergo from one of the Juvenile Judges in Flanders. One in three cases leads to a real conference.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Tania's story
from the article on Restorative Justice Council: When Tania* was robbed on a busy street, her confidence was destroyed. Here, she talks about why she decided to take part in a restorative justice conference with her mugger, and what it gave her back. “I was on my way to the local shops when I felt what I thought was someone bumping into me. It took me a few seconds to realise that someone had grabbed my handbag and I was dragged, screaming, along the pavement. I tried very hard to hold on to it but I couldn’t and the man took off up a side road. It was broad daylight and so there were quite a lot of people around. A lady who had seen everything contacted the police straight away and several people tried to follow the mugger....
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
'I slept through the night for the first time since she died': The mum who went to prison to meet man responsible for daughter's death
from the article by Cathy Owen in Wales Online: Kate Morgan had struggled to come to terms with the death of her 22-year-old daughter Lona Wyn Jones in a horrific car crash two years ago. The 45-year-old from Dolgellau desperately wanted to visit the driver, Ian Edwards, who was sentenced to three years and nine months in prison after pleading guilty to dangerous driving. She said she had questions that only he could answer....
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Addressing the harm done in a crime
from the article by Bill Pesch in Guampdn-com: ...To this day, nearly 20 years later, recalling these events still makes my blood boil. I have no sense of finality or resolution. Most disturbing, I never learned why the kid chose me to vandalize and I've never received an apology. I feel like the system let me down. These emotions welled up again in me a few weeks ago when I was attending a class in restorative justice at the University of Guam. Dave Afaisen, a counselor at the Department of Youth Affairs, and his son, Sage, were guest speakers. They told us a story very similar to mine.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
'Premier League villains' go straight after meeting victims
from the article by Mark Tallentire in The Northern Echo: Durham Police chief constable Mike Barton said between them David Clark and Shaun Morton committed about 500 crimes a year. But after taking part in a restorative justice scheme, both are now drink and drug free and volunteering with other addict criminals.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
File Restorative Justice Conference between R and Mr Q
Held at Cookham Wood YOI in Rochester on the 15th October 2014 at 11am. From the case report by Mark Creitzman.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative Justice Conference between R and Mr Q
from the case report by Mark Creitzman: It was at this point, that Mr Q mentioned that he felt that he would like to be able to forgive R by the end of the meeting and that he had a challenge for R to consider. Mr Q asked R if he was up to a challenge and he nodded ‘Yes’. Mr Q said that if R could prove that he wanted to change the path of his life and made progress in Cookham Wood, that on his exit from the YOI, Mr Q would mentor him and support him through his transition. Mr Q told us that his long-term plan could involve R and himself using the negativity of the offence and turning it in to a ‘power for good’ and delivering sessions to schools, YOIs, colleges or universities.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Comment shine on How restorative justice is steering young offenders away from crime
Each person is responsible for everything they do, good or bad. Parents need to provide a loving home where children feel safe and secure. I [...]
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB / How restorative justice is steering young offenders away from crime / ++conversation++default