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Restorative Justice Storytelling for those harmed, hoping to heal, 3 goals and a story.
Developing the skill set for working with storytellers is one of the most crucial building blocks for developing a successful Restorative Justice program. Stories are a key element in Restorative Justice Circles. Having powerful storytellers . . . common everyday people who have experienced a trauma and have the ability to share that story in a way that is transformative for the teller and listener both.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Sample Circle script, a guideline that does not replace training
from Kris Miner's entry in Restorative Justice and Circles I have always been resistant to scripts. When someone is in converstaion with you, do they read from a paper? Reading is best for with children on our laps and from books. However, in order to teach the process and have others do it, you need to give some examples. So I am sharing a sample script. Each Circle is unique, the questions used should be unique. The shell or outer rim (values, 4 stages, talking piece, open/close) should be the same. The contents swirl within. The experience should be like a labyrinth going in deep to conversation and coming back out. ....When you “keep” a Circle you are making a committment to guide the process. Knowing and understanding the approach in a manner that you can be flexible to the needs of the Circle, requires a deep understanding of the philosophy. Training is crucial, being a participant in Circle is necessary to achieve the deep understanding. The sample script:
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
CorStone Center uses restorative justice circles to build emotional resilience
From their website: The CorStone Center in Sausalito, California, offers a wide and growing range of support groups, trainings and workshops that guide participants toward greater emotional resiliency. Many of our programs work specifically with adults, children or families dealing with life-threatening illness, bereavement, conflict or major life transitions.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Ebbels, Kelly. Circle of Justice
Twenty years ago, elders and community leaders at Hollow Water teamed up with social services counsellors and launched what Hardisty describes as a comprehensive networking and healing system, called Community Holistic Circle Healing (CHCH). If a community member is accused of a crime, instead of being sent to a prison or detainment centre, another community member or an officer refers the victimizer to CHCH. Hollow Water has confronted sexual abuse, incest, and alcoholism not through retributive, punitive measures, but through these restorative-justice healing circles. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Metoui, Jessica. Returning to the Circle: The Reemergence of Traditional Dispute Resolution in Native American Communities
You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round. . . . The Sky is round, and I have heard that the earth is round like a ball, and so are all the stars. ... " Accordingly, large numbers of both victims and perpetrators of domestic violence and sexual assault crimes are in need of services within the criminal justice system in all stages of the process, including law enforcement, adjudication, sentencing, rehabilitation, and reintegration. ... Over a two year period sixty-five offenders completed the CHCH peacemaking circle program. ... The peacemaking circle used in Hollow Water encourages direct acceptance of responsibility, both inwardly and publicly, by requiring the offender to admit the wrongdoing to himself, his family, the victim, and when the final sentencing circle is held, the general public. ... Just as use of a peacemaking circle to resolve disputes or decide on the sentence of a criminal offender facilitates a personalization and cultural relevance in the method of dispute resolution, the imposition by these circles of traditional, community based sentences as opposed to sentences more common to the mainstream American justice system illustrates the desire of tribal groups to tailor the carriage of justice within their communities to culturally relevant ideals. ... Developing peacemaking circle programs also benefit from the growing alternate dispute resolution and restorative justice movements in western legal context. (Authors Abstract)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Cameron, Angela. Sentencing Circles and Intimate Violence: A Canadian feminist Perspective.
Advocates of restorative justice claim that these models can benefit offenders, victims, and communities and also address historical injustices perpetrated against Aboriginal peoples. These claims extend to cases of intimate violence. In the case of judicially convened sentencing circles in cases of intimate violence in Canada, these claims have not been born out. In fact, by measuring the outcomes in these cases against recent studies of bettered women's needs, these models, as they are currently constituted, have inadequately addressed social injustice and inequality experienced by women within Canadian Aboriginal communities, and in some instances, have revictimized survivors of intimate violence. (author's abstract)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Sapir, Brian . Healing a Fractured Community: The Use of Community Sentencing Circles in Response to Hate Crimes
"Within the Restorative Justice community of the United States, circle sentencing (also known as community circles, peacemaking circles, or healing circles ) has evolved since the early 1990's as an effective way of healing the harm that the offender's crime has done to the community, as well as getting to the root of the problems which may have contributed to the offender's actions in the first place. ... The victim is given an opportunity to voice his or her fear and rage at being victimized; the victim also has a chance to hear the offender's story and gain a better understanding of why the crime occurred; and lastly the victim walks away from the situation with reparations and a sense of having been involved in the justice process and an overall feeling of closure. ... Americans must learn from the experiences of post September 11 not only to prepare for and prevent such crimes, but also to provide victims and communities with the appropriate tools to handle the fear and anger resulting from such victimization. ... The exclusion of the community from the healing process by Victim-Offender Mediation and other Restorative Justice programs makes Sentencing Circles the ideal technique to be used in hate crime cases. ... While Circles have primarily dealt with non-violent offenses, it is a stark reality that hate crimes manifest themselves in a spectrum of offenses including the ultra-violent." (Excerpt from Author)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Cunliffe, Emma and Cameron, Angela. Writing the Circle: Judicially Convened Sentencing Circles and the Textual Organization of Criminal Justice.
Trial court judges who work in remote northern Canadian Aboriginal communities use judicially convened sentencing circles to gather information and develop sentencing recommendations in some intimate violence cases. Proponents claim that judicially convened sentencing circles are a restorative justice practice that heals the offender, his community, and the survivor of the violence. Proponents also look to sentencing circles as a tool to fmd a just outcome that minimizes Aboriginal men's incarceration. We use a methodology developed by feminist sociologist Dorothy Smith to consider whether the institutional priorities being established and approved by courts in sentencing circle cases provide adequate protection for Aboriginal women against recurrent intimate violence in their communities. Finding that Aboriginal women's experiences of violence are largely excluded from the realm of institutional concern, we suggest that judicially convened sentencing circles present a deceptively simple solution to the complex and longstanding problem of Aboriginal people's experiences with the Canadian criminal justice system. It is therefore important to counter the discourses that claim that judicially convened sentencing circles have the potential to restore Aboriginal communities. This article counters that discourse in two ways: first, by identifying that Aboriginal women's experiences and knowledge are being excluded from the judicial construction of Aboriginal communities in these cases; and, second, by reasserting that any solution to the problem of intimate violence must be part of a broader effort to overcome poverty and the legacy of colonialism within Aboriginal communities. (author's abstract)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Libin, Kevin. Sentencing circles for aboriginals: Good justice?
Barry Stuart wishes he had never called them "sentencing circles." The former Yukon judge was the first in Canada to implement the controversial practice, initially in the landmark 1992 case, R. v. Moses. He used them regularly and they soon spread across Canada, primarily dealing with aboriginal offenders. Even in his retirement today, Justice Stuart consults with private organizations looking to adopt the "circle" model for conflict resolution. He retains his love for the concept, but his distaste for the label. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Libin, Kevin. Sentencing circles for aboriginals: Good justice?
Barry Stuart wishes he had never called them "sentencing circles." The former Yukon judge was the first in Canada to implement the controversial practice, initially in the landmark 1992 case, R. v. Moses. He used them regularly and they soon spread across Canada, primarily dealing with aboriginal offenders. Even in his retirement today, Justice Stuart consults with private organizations looking to adopt the "circle" model for conflict resolution. He retains his love for the concept, but his distaste for the label. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles