Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

95 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type











New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
RJ Article McKee, Ian and Strelan, Peter and Feather, N. T. . Retributive and Inclusive Justice Goals and Forgiveness: The Influence of Motivational Values.
Who is more likely to forgive, given that justice is important and motivating for people? In this article, we argue that the relation between justice and forgiveness depends on the type of justice involved; specifically, the goals of justice, i.e. retributive versus inclusive. We also explored the influence of motivational values on justice goals and forgiveness. Using data from 178 undergraduate psychology students who responded to measures of retributive and inclusive justice attitudes, forgiveness attitudes and dispositions, and values, we found support for our hypotheses that retributive justice goals are negatively related to forgiving attitudes and dispositions; inclusive justice goals are positively related to forgiveness; and benevolence and power values play the dominant role in predicting forgiveness. The results have implications for how the relation between justice and forgiveness is conceptualised and applied. (Excerpt).
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Levad, Amy. Restorative Justice: Theories and Practices of Moral Imagination.
Criminal justice systems in the United States are in crisis. Currently over 7.3 million adults in the U.S. are under some form of supervision, including probation, prison, and parole, by state, local, or federal criminal justice systems. At midyear 2009, nearly 1.6 million of these people were in prion, and nearly 800,000 were in jail. While these numbers are troubling enough to raise serious questions about our criminal justice systems, discrepancies related to race and ethnicity among prison and jail populations add greater urgency to addressing this crisis. Racial and ethnic minority populations are incarcerated at astounding rates in comparison with whites. This identity crisis suggests that addressing high rates of incarceration as well as the disparities that riddle criminal and juvenile justice systems requires reconsideration of basic ideologies and practices of justice. Among the questions that must arise in this process of reconsideration is whether justice is being realized in any meaningful sense. True, people must face the consequences of their crimes. Bu what do we understand "justice" to mean, and how can we know if it is being realized? What should the nature of our criminal and juvenile justice systems be? What consequences do our interpretations of justice entail for victims, offenders, and our communities in the wake of crime? How should our ideologies of justice be instituted in practice? (Excerpt).
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Immarigeon, Russ. Women and Girls in the Criminal Justice System: Policy Issues and Practice Strategies.
Gender matters is a lesson that is being learned increasingly by academics, advocates, policy makers, and practitioners in the field of corrections. This book seeks to advance knowledge and awareness on this topic and to broaden the acknowledgement of the importance of developing consciously designed plans, programs, and policies for women offenders by soliciting and compiling articles that address the critically important issues that still challenge those who work with women and girls in the American criminal justice system.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Petersen, Rodney L.. Racism, Restorative Justice, and Reconciliation.
Issues of race, restorative justice, and reconciliation have shaped civil politics and church polity through the years of growing globalization, from the fifteenth century to the present. There is no other time in history than in the days since 9/11 that the world has more needed a consciousness of common humanity. Jessica Montell, Israeli human rights activist, calls the name of the organization that she helped to found Β 'Tselem Elohim, Hebrew for "in the image of God." This stresses that Jew and Arab, Hutu and Tutsi, Afrikaner and Bantu—all are made "in the image" (Genesis 1:27). Miroslav Volf, writing out of his experience in southeast Europe, finds the concept of "otherness" to be the defining theological issue for our times. What does it mean, he asks, to welcome equally cetnik and ustashel Or, from our perspective in North America, to so welcome Native peoples, Euro-American, Asian, African, or the multitude of others who now populate this continent (Volf 1996:9)? Thoughts like these must shape a contemporary mission mentality, not only for Christians but for all religious groups.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Johnstone, Gerry. Restorative Justice: Ideas, Values, Debates. (Second Edition).
Restorative Justice: Ideas, Values, Debates, provides a concise but informative introduction to the fundamental ideas of restorative justice and the many arguments surrounding the movement. Although not a detailed history or explanation of theory, the book offers an informative and clear look at the restorative justice movement, its opposing arguments, and its possibilities for the future. This second edition keeps the original text almost intact, with only some minor revisions, but with an additional chapter (chapter 9), which looks at developments in the campaign for restorative justice over the last decade. (Excerpt).
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Donald W Shriver. REPAIRING THE PAST : Polarities of Restorative Justice
Forging links between academic analysis and the hard, practical work of politicians is a neglected art. Behind the difficulty are the threats of ambiguity. Making a decision to do something is different from thinking about doing. There is a "leap", H. Richard Niebuhr used to say, "from the chair into the battle." There are few subjects so fraught with ambiguity than that of "repairing the past." Some pragmatists would label it as a non-starter: the past is gone. It is not there to be repaired. Quite the opposite claim came from William Faulkner in 1950: "The past is not dead and gone; it isn't even past." Since about 1990, the world has seen multiple, diligent human efforts to revisit, uncover, and revise the collective pasts of societies whose members have been horribly, unjustly damaged. Court trials, truth commissions, history revisions abound. It is as if the post-Soviet 1990s had freed citizens of all levels to look hard at the monstrous horrors of the twentieth century, which to date set the record for numbers of human-enacted ldllings of each other. These efforts altogether may be grouped under "transitional justice." If academics and politicians are to collaborate in thinking about repairing the past, they vwll need to juggle variables and combinations of ideas and forces which account for the ambiguities. What I shall offer here is a proposal for how to grasp a set of issues which filter through many ofthe discussions of academics regarding the hard, practical work of politicians and others on the front lines of transitional justice.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Kimberly Spiers. Restorative Justice in South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commision
This thesis examines the founding documents of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commision(SATRC) to assess if the commission was founded on restorative justice values(RJ).Following this,a discourse analysis is employed to examine a sample of transcripts from the victims' hearings and the outcomes of the hearings to assess whether or not the victim hearings followed RJ practices and if the outcomes were indeed of a restorative nature. It is concluded that the SATRC was founded on RJ values and the practices utilized through the hearings were restorative in nature. However,it cannot be concluded that the outcomes of the hearings and the SATRC were entirely restorative in nature. This conclusion takes into account that each individual's experiences are unique, as are his/her expectations. Furthermore, many of the outcomes identified in this thesis may take a lifetime to achieve ,if ever.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Stephen Noguera and Carolyn Hoyle. Supporting Young Offenders Through Restorative Justice:Parents As (In)Appropriate Adults
Set within the wider context of responsibilising youth justice policies, this article heeds academic calls for further research into parent/child dynamics within restorative justice processes(Prichard,2002;Bradt et al.,2007),by critically analysing and evaluating the role of parents as supporters of young offenders.The aim is not to call into question the entitlement of parents to be present during restorative processes, but to critically examine their suitability to play the role of designated supporters. Drawing upon the literature as well as empirical work conducted by the first author(Hoyle et al., 2002), it will be argued that many of the moralising and responsibilising messages directed at the offender find currency with parents in a way which makes them feel ashamed,embarrassed and if they themselves are on trial.Parents react to this discomfort by engaging in apologising,neutralising,dominating and punitive discourses.Their reactions not only cast doubt upon their ability to be composed and supportive of their children,but more importantly might adversely affect the dynamics of the process itself.Parental reactions might thereby deny the young person the opportunity to take responsibility for their actions and to contribute to the discussion on appropriate reparation,which could ultimately thwart the chance for reintegration.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Lydia Apori Nkansah. Transitional Justice in Postconflict Contexts: The Case of Sierra Leone’s Dual Accountability Mechanisms
Literature on in-depth studies of dual transitional justice mechanisms in postconflict settings is inadequate. This qualitative case study sought to understand the practice of dual transitional justice by examining the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the Special Court engaged for transitional justice in postconflict Sierra Leone. Data consisted of documentary sources, observational field notes and 31 individual semistructured interviews with open-ended questions of Sierra Leonean public officials, United Nations officials, and TRC and Special Court officials, as well as civil society actors. Data were analyzed through detailed “description”, “categorical aggregation”, “direct interpretation”, establishment of “correspondence and patterns”, and development of “naturalistic generalizations”. It was found that because the 2 institutions were not planned and coordinated as different parts of the same tool, they were pitched against each other, undermining their respective mandates and creating tensions in their efforts to implement their plans. Also, the Sierra Leonean populace, civil society organizations, the government and the international community, including the United Nations, were divided in their opinions, sentiments and support for the 2 mechanisms. The implication of this study is that the policy choice, design and packaging of restorative and retributive mechanisms for postconflict transitional justice should not create conflict so that they can link seamlessly to the strategic goal of peace and stability. The knowledge of the dynamics of dual transitional justice is useful for governments, policy makers, the United Nations and especially the International Criminal Court whose intervention in a country may run parallel to a restorative process.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Immarigeon, Russ. Women and Girls in the Criminal Justice System: Policy Issues and Practice Strategies. Volume II.
Gender matters is a lesson that is being learned increasingly by academics, advocates, policy makers, and practitioners in the field of corrections. This book seeks to advance knowledge and awareness on this topic and to broaden the acknowledgement of the importance of developing consciously designed plans, programs, and policies for women offenders by soliciting and compiling articles that address the critically important issues that still challenge those who work with women and girls in the American criminal justice system.
Located in articlesdb / articles