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A second chance at Curt's Cafe
from the article by Susan Du in The Daily Northwestern: Curt’s Cafe, 2922 Central St., is an unlikely crossroads for the two: Trieschmann hires at-risk young adults, particularly those with criminal records, providing them with hard-to-find job training and work experience. The non-profit restaurant is one of the only adult ex-offender re-entry programs in a city that focuses most of its re-entry resources on at-risk youths. Trieschmann said the road to opening the experimental business was far from smooth, with some neighbors concerned about the business drawing former criminals to Central Street. Still, it’s an experiment that restorative justice advocates and even Evanston Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl said is worth a shot.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Petrunik, Michael and Fedoroff, J. Paul and Murphy, Lisa. American and Canadian Approaches to Sex Offenders: A Study of the Politics of Dangerousness.
In this Article, we describe and attempt to account for differences between American and Canadian approaches to managing the dangerousness of sex offenders, whether through community protection legislative initiatives; treatment, including cognitive-behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy, such as the use of antiandrogens; or restorative justice alternatives, such as Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA). Over the past two decades, in both the United States and Canada, clinical models of dangerousness emphasizing diagnosis and treatment of psychopathology have been supplanted by approaches emphasizing actuarial risk assessment and risk management. In addition, concerns with fundamental justice issues, such as due process, proportionality, and privacy rights, have given way to community protection concerns. However, in the United States, community protection concerns promoted by politically influential victims’ advocates within and outside of government have arguably been more influential than in Canada. Additionally, a variety of factors, including a generally more cautious approach to legislative reform, sensitivity to the limits posed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms enacted in 1982, and a less politically influential victims’ movement, have limited the speed and extent of the development of the community protection approach in Canada. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
Michael Vick, Bill Simmons, forgiveness and restorative justice
from Eliyahu Fink's post on Pacific Jewish Center: Bill Simmons (aka The Sports Guy) wrote a recent [espn.com] column about Michael Vick and his comeback. ....Simmons writes that Vick emerged as the “feel good story” of the NFL. But his wife disagrees. The Sports Gal cannot forgive Vick. The Sports Gal says that if you love dogs, you cannot possibly forgive Vick. Sport Guy retorts that Vick did everything humanly possibly to pay for his crimes, apologize and rehabilitate his life. He lost EVERYTHING. He said he was genuinely sorry. He is fixing what he broke. Vick is a real Restorative Justice story. And Bill Simmons forgives him. Mrs. Simmons loves dogs too much to forgive Vick. The article is a great read and I recommend reading it.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie. An Unofficial Funeral: Imagining Restorative Justice and Reconciliation at Riverbend Maximum Security Prison.
In this article we attend to a particular liturgical event to see how imagination helps us to perceive the manifestation of God's redemptive work amidst the particularity of human lives. Our unofficial ritualizing of Harmon's funeral required numerous imaginative moments that brought about redemption, reconciliation and genuine transformation in ways that reflected Harmon's life of presence to and work among the men of Riverbend. In remembering Harmon together, we also remembered the distinctive impact he had on each of our lives, an impact that had enabled us to imagine ourselves and each other as new creations, reconciled to each other by God's power. Our imaginative liturgy performance made present to us the Harmon we had known, the Christ who had always been revealed to us in Harmon's unconditional love, and the unconditional love of that Christ among us, drawing us towards each other in love. (Excerpt).
Located in articlesdb / articles
Rena captain to residents: 'Sorry'
from the article by Kiri Gillespie in the Bay of Plenty Times: Rena's captain and navigational officer have visited Motiti Island to apologise to residents for grounding the cargo ship on Astrolabe Reef. When Rena grounded on October 5 last year, Motiti Island was transformed from a pristine green paradise to an oil-soaked mess. Residents were shocked, saddened and angry.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Muhammad and the 'closure' myth
from Naseem Rakha's column in the Washington Post: ....In the past decade, 24 U.S. prisons have begun victim-offender dialogue programs. These programs give victims' survivors opportunities to meet with, talk to and ask questions of the offenders, often questions only the offender can answer. According to John Wilson, director of Just Alternatives, a group that trains prison personnel in the dialogue program, this victim-led initiative has brought a sense of power and renewal to the lives of survivors. "Survivors can go through years of therapy, but until they have the opportunity to talk with their offenders, their healing often feels unfinished," he said.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice from a survivor's perspective
by Penny Beerntsen Note: this article originally appeared as a comment responding to a posting by Lisa Rea. We were concerned that many readers may have missed it and so are posting it as its own entry. We are grateful to Penny Beerntsen for her willingness to share her extraordinary story. As a survivor of a violent crime, I am a firm believer in the power of restorative justice programs to transform both the victim and the offender. I learned about victim offender conferencing shortly after surviving a violent sexual assault and attempted murder. Although I was unable to meet with my offender, as he had not taken responsibility for his crime, I began participating in victim impact panels inside prisons. Although I was not speaking directly to my offender, I was telling my story to others who were incarcerated for violent crimes, including rape. Much of my healing took place inside maximum security prisons as a result of the dialogue I engaged in with these offenders. If someone had told me at the time of the crime that this would be the case, I would have told that individual they were crazy! I participated in these panels because I thought I had something to offer the offenders. I learned that the process, if properly conducted, is mutually beneficial.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Three-year research project on mediation and restorative justice in prison settings
from the flyer announcing the project: The Mediation and Restorative Justice in Prison Settings Project is a three year international exchange project funded by the European Commission, between the counties of Germany, Hungary and the UK. The project will identify, exchange and develop best practice for the use of restorative justice (“RJ”) with the most serious crimes, particularly those against persons and property attracting a custodial sentence. Research suggests that RJ can have the biggest impact on the lives of victims and offenders where such serious crimeshave been committed.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Blaha, Magdolna Fabianne and Velez, Edit and Negrea, Vidia. The use of family group conferencing/Decision-making with prisoners in prison probation and during after-care in Hungary.
For years now, the Hungarian Probation Service has considered it one of its main tasks to use the methods of restorative justice more extensively in their work with offenders. These efforts were supported by the fact that the probation service is now responsible for the tasks related to mediation and as such mediation in criminal cases has become an institutional form of restorative justice. The Probation service is working on the implementation of restorative justice principles in other types of cases also, and is trying to ensure that the various techniques and procedures become integral parts of the probation officers' case management methodology. To this end, various experimental projects were launched. One of these was a project which the purpose was to include the method of family group conferencing/decision-making in the case management of probation officers. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
File Hook, Melissa And Seymour, Anne. Offender reentry requires attention to victim safety
In this article Hook and Seymour address issues concerning the rights and safety of victims when offenders leave prison and reenter societ
Located in Full-Text Documents at RJ Online