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Nelson Police Department rolls out innovative restorative justice program
From the article in the Boundary Sentinel: The Nelson Police Department is advocating for the introduction of a Restorative Justice program as an option to laying criminal charges when a crime has been committed.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Stevens, Chris. Becoming a "fully Restorative Youth Justice Service": Restorative justice in Surrey.
So what do we mean by ‘fully restorative service’? We think the answer lies in our endeavour to put restorative values at the heart of all of our relationships and practices within the youth justice system, so that the restorative justice agenda moves beyond interest in ‘victims’ and ‘offenders’ and what we might do to heal and repair when things go wrong, it furthers application of restorative approaches in the ways that we manage relationships between ourselves as work force; to how we apply restorative values to our approach to case management and enabling compliance; to underpin our approach to delivering group work programmes; and strengthening families through our parenting support provision. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
Green Paper: Breaking the cycle - Effective punishment, rehabilitation and sentencing of offenders
from the UK Government's new Green Paper: 78. We are committed to increasing the range and availability of restorative justice approaches to support reparation. Restorative justice is the name given to processes which provide victims with the opportunity to play a personal role in determining how an offender makes amends. This can often include direct reparation. A substantial minority of victims would consider meeting their offender by way of a restorative justice process and those victims who do report high levels of satisfaction. The evidence suggests that the approach may also have a positive impact on the offender’s likelihood of reoffending in the future. Getting an offender to confront the consequences of their crimes directly is often an effective punishment for less serious offences.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Exercising Discretion: The Gateway to Justice
A study by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate on cautions, penalty notices for disorder and restorative justice In 2009, 38 per cent of the 1.29 million offences ‘solved’ by police were dealt with outside of the court system. We found that the use of out-of-court disposals has evolved in a piecemeal and largely uncontrolled way. An earlier public survey conducted on behalf of HMIC confirmed general public support for giving first-time offenders a second chance – which out-of-court options certainly offer; but this public support ebbs away when they are used for persistent offenders. Our work also suggested that victim satisfaction is high when offenders take part in RJ approaches. RJ, used appropriately, may also reduce re-offending.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
File Wright, Martin, (2002) Restorative Justice Outside the Criminal Justice System: How Far Have We Come? Paper to Second Conference of the European Forum for Victim/Offender Mediation and Restorative Justice. Oostende, Belgium, 10-12 October 2002.
Many people have commented on the difficulty of defining restorative justice. It is like a growing child: as soon as its parents have provided some clothes, it has grown and more are needed. The idea of community involvement in the process is just one example. Its grandparents, so to speak, come from different backgrounds; and many of them were practitioners rather than theorists. This paper will consider how restorative justice started with programmes that brought the community into the criminal justice system or diverting cases out of it, ending with the use of restorative justice outside the system. (excerpt)
Located in Full-Text Documents at RJ Online
File Economic analysis of interventions for young adult offenders
from the report for the Barrow Cadbury Trust by Matrix Evidence: This report summarises an economic analysis of alternative interventions for young adult offenders. It concludes that, for all offenders aged 18-24 sentenced in a Magistrate’s court for a non-violent offence1 in a given year: Diversion from community orders to pre-court RJ conferencing schemes (following a police triage service in which police officers make an immediate assessment of the need and likely benefit from a community intervention) is likely to produce a lifetime cost saving to society of almost £275 million (£7,050 per offender). The costs of RJ conferencing are likely to be paid back within the first year of implementation. During the course of two parliaments (10 years), implementation of such a scheme would be likely to lead to a total net benefit to society during this period of over £1 billion. Diversion from custody to community orders via changes in sentencing guidelines is likely to produce a lifetime cost saving to society of more than £12 million (£1,032 per offender). The costs of changing sentencing guidelines are likely to be paid back within three years of implementation. During the course of two parliaments (10 years), implementation of such a scheme would be likely to lead to a total net benefit to society during this period of almost £33 million. Diversion from trial under adult law to trial under juvenile law following maturity assessment is likely to produce a lifetime cost saving to society of almost £5 million (£420 per offender). The costs of maturity assessments are likely to be paid back within five years of implementation. During the course of two parliaments (10 years), implementation of such a scheme would be likely to lead to a total net benefit to society during this period of almost £473,000.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice handles punishment
From the article in the Courier Islander: Five Campbell River residents including one juvenile found themselves in hot water after they were identified as the vandals who targeted the new Splash Park with graffiti and broke a bench almost as soon as the popular attraction was opened. "The community in general was greatly annoyed at these events with many people taking to social media and local newspapers to voice their displeasure at the actions of those involved," said Troy Beauregard, Staff Sgt. and Operations Commander of the Campbell River RCMP.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Approaching juvenile crime head on
From the article by Leila day: When people get into trouble with the law, they normally don’t have a chance to have a conversation with their victims. To explain what happened. Hear about the damage they caused. Say they’re sorry. But there’s a growing trend to try and make that happen, so both parties can move on. Restorative Justice brings together the accused, the victim, supportive parties, and authorities. All at the same table in a safe space. It’s an old idea and it’s international. In fact, in New Zealand, where it was originally used by indigenous Maoris, it's a mandatory part of the criminal justice system. Here, in the U.S, these community conferences are increasingly being used in prisons, schools and as an alternative to juvenile detention.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Six boys, one cop, and the road to restorative justice
from the article by Molly Rowan Leach: It’s a warm summer night in Longmont, Colorado, a vibrant midsized city in the Rocky Mountains. On a dare, six young men aged between ten and thirteen years plan to break into a giant chemical processing plant. High levels of alcohol and testosterone, peer pressure and a moonless night propel the group towards the locked gates of the factory, and they break in. Across town at the Police Department, Officer Greg Ruprecht is about to embark on night patrol. A former Army Captain and top of his class at the Police Academy, Ruprecht believes his job is to arrest everyone who commits a crime and throw away the key. Justice means punishment: an eye for an eye, no questions asked. You do something bad and you get what you deserve. There’s a clear line to walk. But what occurred at the chemical plant that night changed him forever by awakening a very different sensibility: instead of an instrument of vengeance, justice requires that we work to restore all those who have been injured by a crime.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice will cover the country
From the article on Voxy.co.nz: Justice Minister Judith Collins has ... announced restorative justice services will be expanded and rolled out to all courts in New Zealand. An additional 2,400 restorative justice conferences - totalling 3,600 in 2014/15 - follow the Government’s $4.4 million investment in adult pre-sentence restorative justice as part of Budget 2013. Ms Collins says investing in pre-sentence restorative justice will help deliver results, give victims a voice in the justice system and make victims strong.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB