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Restorative justice may provide additional justice mechanism for victims of sexual crime, study shows
from the article on Phys.org: According to the findings of a recently published study, restorative justice could provide an additional justice mechanism for victims of sexual crime which can support the needs of victims, offenders, and their families, in the aftermath of sexual crime in Ireland. The study entitled "Sexual Trauma and Abuse, Restorative and Transformative Possibilities?" based on 149 interviews with victims, offenders, judges and others, and a review of the global literature found that "all cohorts of participants are in favour of restorative justice in sexual violence cases as an additional justice mechanism for victims of sexual crime, as all participants recognise the considerable gaps that exist in current justice provision for victims of sexual crime in this state"....
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Ireland Exploring Further Restorative Justice Implementation
The National Commission on Restorative Justice (Commission) in Ireland has released an interim report on its work to develop a policy framework for expanding the use of restorative justice throughout the country. The report suggests possible pilot projects and describes issues still to be studied.
Located in Previous Editions / 2008 / July 2008 Edition
Ireland Exploring Further Restorative Justice Implementation
The National Commission on Restorative Justice (Commission) in Ireland has released an interim report on its work to develop a policy framework for expanding the use of restorative justice throughout the country. The report suggests possible pilot projects and describes issues still to be studied.
Located in Previous Editions / 2009 / January 2009 Edition.
Brady encourages Magdalene survivors in talks with church
from Genevieve Carbery and Patsy McGarry's entries in Irishtimes.com.: Primate of All-Ireland Cardinal Seán Brady has encouraged Magdalene survivors in their efforts to establish dialogue with religious congregations. The cardinal met representatives of advocacy group Justice for Magdalenes (JFM) for two hours at his residence in Armagh on Thursday evening. He said yesterday it was a welcome opportunity to listen to the perspective of the JFM on “the story of the involvement of church, State and society in the former Magdalene laundries”. “By today’s standards much of what happened at that time is difficult to comprehend,” he said.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Mika, Harry. Community-Based Peacebuilding: A Case Study in Northern Ireland.
Drawing upon a careful assessment of community efforts to reduce paramilitary punishment violence in Loyalist and Republican working class areas of Northern Ireland, this paper explores the impact of former combatants as agents of the peace process.
Located in articlesdb / articles
File Griffin, Diarmuid. Restorative Justice, Diversion and Social Control: Potential Problems
This paper will highlight some potential dangers of pursuing the use of restorative justice (RJ) for juvenile offenders in Ireland. It will look at penal reforms of the past; in particular it will look at the work of Stanley Cohen and his examination of the development of “community corrections.” Social control theorists, like Cohen, often view changes in penal structures differently to reformists and examine the underlying impact of expanding the social control apparatus beyond the prison system. In this presentation I intend to use the template used by Stanley Cohen in the 70’s to analyse the development of restorative justice in the juvenile justice system. The dangers highlighted by Cohen will then be applied to restorative practices in order to provide a framework for the critique of this approach. While it is acknowledged that the development of such programmes are essential in developing an appropriate response to juvenile offending it is also important to critically discuss these projects to highlight the problems and potential dangers emerging out of their adoption. The focus of the paper will remain primarily on restorative programmes although many of the criticisms discussed can also be levied at diversionary programmes.
Located in Full-Text Documents at RJ Online
RJ Article Haverty, Marty and Martin, Mary. The work of the National Commission on Restorative Justice: Promoting cooperation amongst society
A statement from the Commission for Restorative Justice about the applicability of restorative justice practices in Ireland, including a brief overview of personnel in the Commission and its objectives. It summarizes recent research and highlights areas that require more research, especially the delivery of restorative justice, legislation efforts, accreditation of programs, and potential cost.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Haverty, Martin. Integrating wholesale restorative justice within Irish society: Issues and considerations facing policy makers.
Restorative Justice has grown from a few scattered experimental projects, into a social movement and an identifiable field of practice and study. While restorative justice is provided for within the Irish criminal justice system, its application is confined under statute to juvenile offenders. The National Commission on Restorative Justice are now in the process of evaluating how a national roll out of restorative justice might be achieved within the jurisdiction. In this article the main challenges facing the National Commission on Restorative Justice (Ireland) will be outlined, particularly having regard to their terms of reference. The article will also explore existing provisions catering for restorative justice in this jurisdiction, while giving a brief explanation on the core principles and values underpinning restorative justice. (author's abstract)
Located in articlesdb / articles
State in denial over Magdalenes
from James M. Smith's letter in IrishTimes.com: Last Friday week I attended a meeting with senior Department of Justice officials. I had been invited as a representative of the survivor advocacy group, Justice for Magdalenes (JFM). We are campaigning to bring about an apology and a distinct redress scheme for these survivors of institutional abuse. An apology, I contend, is key in effecting restorative justice for this community of women. To date, no one in Ireland has apologised for abuses in the laundries – not church, not State, not families, not the wider community. All these segments of society were complicit in this historic abuse but no one is prepared to stand up and say, “I am sorry”. No one is prepared to admit that what happened to these women and young girls was wrong.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article National Commission on Restorative Justice. Final Report
This more-detailed treatment commences with a review of the approach of the Commission and its understanding of restorative justice. It proceeds to study how restorative justice has been applied at home and abroad, before looking at the impact it has made on stakeholders and at the Irish context in which it would apply. The Commission is then in a position to assess what is needed and makes recommendations on how wider provision should be made. It concludes by making tentative projections as to potential scale and by outlining appropriate steps it considers should be taken to apply restorative justice more widely. This sequence is also reflected in the executive summary below. (Excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles