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Comment john ngabo on Lisa Rea: Restorative Justice: Restoring Victims and Communities.
The healing,and the transformation of both the victim and the offender from fear,vulnerability, and from shame and guilty is through restorative dialogue,apology and reparation from [...]
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB / Lisa Rea: Restorative Justice: Restoring Victims and Communities. / ++conversation++default
Advocating for restorative justice before a legislative body: How to make the case
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Violent juveniles serving life without parole: When victims of crime disagree
By Lisa Rea I would like to draw your attention to a very controversial piece of US federal legislation, HR 2289, which seeks to address the problem of juvenile lifers who are serving life sentences. The expressed purpose of the bill is to "establish a meaningful opportunity for parole or similar release of juvenile offenders sentenced to life in prison."
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Penn State's response to child sexual abuse: What about the victims?
by Lisa Rea As the story comes out in more detail about the alleged sexual abuse of children by Jerry Sandusky, former assistant football coach at Penn State, the coverage of the story seems to be more about the actions of veteran coach Joe Paterno--his resignation or the university's decision to fire him.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Lisa Rea: Restorative Justice: Restoring Victims and Communities.
From the article by Lisa Rea and Theo Gavrielides: Victims-driven restorative justice is built on the premise that an offender needs to see the direct impact that his crime had on his victim and on the community, and should be given the opportunity to make amends and seek to provide a form of reparation to those he injured. Through the voluntary participation of both the victim and the offender engaged in an honest and constructive dialogue (i.e. mediation, family group conferencing, circles, etc.) facilitated by trained professionals, the participants benefit from the information exchange.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Comment Shirley on Violent juveniles serving life without parole: When victims of crime disagree
I think juvniles need another çhange they let alot of people out that kill.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB / Violent juveniles serving life without parole: When victims of crime disagree / ++conversation++default
Greg Wilhoit: The story of an innocent man
by Lisa Rea I have a friend whose name is Greg Wilhoit. His story is a remarkable one. He is an exoneree who was freed from death row in Oklahoma after having served time for a crime he did not commit. He was convicted and sent to death row for the killing of his wife. The only incriminating "evidence" which convicted Greg Wilhoit was teeth marks found on the victim's body. Dental "experts" said the teeth marks matched Greg's. His story is on the website of The Journey of Hope: Greg is active with the Journey, as are many exonerees, as he tells his story of America's broken criminal justice system.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Healing the victims of Lockerbie
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
It's not okay
By Lisa Rea I have worked as an advocate for restorative justice and criminal justice reform working with both offenders, and their families, through Justice Fellowship as its state director in California in the 1990's, and then working with victims of violent of crime through the creation of The Justice & Reconciliation Project (JRP), a national nonprofit seeking to provide a forum for victims to tell their stories. I can tell you I have seen crime from both perspectives. Advocates who represent victims and advocates who represent prisoners would both agree on one thing: prison rape is never okay. That is why the actions of a federal prison rape commission are so important.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Limiting DNA testing and denying justice to victims
from Lisa Rea, writing at Change.org: But for God’s sake, if we know we have hundreds or thousands of innocents behind bars must we not do everything in our power to set them free if we live in a civilized society? Absolutely. This court ruling will now make this work harder and slower. As I said earlier, crime victims are hurt - not helped - by this ruling. The challenge on top of this urgent need to free those who are wrongfully convicted is to remember then that someone who is actually guilty of that crime is free at large. Ask a crime victim how they would view that fact. Having worked in the restorative justice field for 15 years I can tell you that crime victims want the system to get it right. There can be no restoration of crime victims, nor can there be offender accountability - two key elements of restorative justice, if the real perpetrator is not caught.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB