Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

131 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type











New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
How we forgave my son's vicious killer: Parents whose teenage boy was beaten to death by thugs come face-to-face with offenders
from the article by Deborah Arthurs in the Daily Mail: In a meeting arranged by the Restorative Justice programme and mediators at the charity CALM (Confidential And Local Mediation), the couple met with two of the three perpetrators responsible for the crime when they came to the end of their sentences. And in a moment of heart-wrenching humanity that brings tears to the eyes, Ray says that when one of the offenders entered the room, all he wanted to do was hug him.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Penn State's response to child sexual abuse: What about the victims?
by Lisa Rea As the story comes out in more detail about the alleged sexual abuse of children by Jerry Sandusky, former assistant football coach at Penn State, the coverage of the story seems to be more about the actions of veteran coach Joe Paterno--his resignation or the university's decision to fire him.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Talbot, Mary E. . Public Responsiveness to Victim's Recommendations in their Sentencing Decisions: Role of Victim's Race, Victim Impact Statement and Judge's Instruction.
This research proposal is aimed at understanding the gap in justice between Caucasian victims and African American victims. The literature on Victim Impact Statements (VIS) provided in the penalty/sentencing phases in trials may provide some solutions to level the playing field. VIS serves as a voice for the victims or crime, and helps the jurors to see the victim as human being rather than a faceless victim. Studies have shown that the greater harm caused is related to greater blameworthiness of defendant (Feigenson, Park, & Salovey, 1997). Moreover, this research assesses whether the public supports restorative sentencing options for convicted offenders of burglary and aggravated battery, and whether this support generalizes to offenders who victimize African-American as well as Caucasian individuals. (Excerpt).
Located in articlesdb / articles
Finding forgiveness
from SBS Dateline: Dateline has a touching story of friendship between a woman who was shot and critically injured, and the stranger who attempted to kill her. Jackie Millar took years to recover after she was shot in the head. She remains almost blind and permanently brain damaged, unable to even remember bringing up her own sons.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice & restorative mediation
from Julie Speer's blog entry: This past year I’ve had the good fortune of telling several stories related to restorative justice and restorative mediation. Colorado is leading the way with RJ (Restorative Justice), and has gotten a large grant from the Department of Justice to look at how using RJ can decrease the costs to the system. When offenders go through an RJ process, their rate of recidivism is astonishingly low!
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice from a survivor's perspective
by Penny Beerntsen Note: this article originally appeared as a comment responding to a posting by Lisa Rea. We were concerned that many readers may have missed it and so are posting it as its own entry. We are grateful to Penny Beerntsen for her willingness to share her extraordinary story. As a survivor of a violent crime, I am a firm believer in the power of restorative justice programs to transform both the victim and the offender. I learned about victim offender conferencing shortly after surviving a violent sexual assault and attempted murder. Although I was unable to meet with my offender, as he had not taken responsibility for his crime, I began participating in victim impact panels inside prisons. Although I was not speaking directly to my offender, I was telling my story to others who were incarcerated for violent crimes, including rape. Much of my healing took place inside maximum security prisons as a result of the dialogue I engaged in with these offenders. If someone had told me at the time of the crime that this would be the case, I would have told that individual they were crazy! I participated in these panels because I thought I had something to offer the offenders. I learned that the process, if properly conducted, is mutually beneficial.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restoring a sense of justice in broken communities
from Stephen Moffatt's entry on Open Democracy's 50.50: Last summer major cities in the UK saw serious urban unrest for the first time in a generation. The underlying causes, reasons for the rapid escalation and reaction of public services to the unrest have been the subject of several studies, notably Reading the Riots ↑ and the Independent Riots Communities and Victims Panel ↑ , whose work continues. The evidence that emerged has already established a clear link between deprivation and rioting, a fact acknowledged by the Independent Riots Panel in their interim report.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
'Why I must speak out to stop my rapist being freed'
from the article by David Barrett in the Telegraph: After Dr Claire Chung was raped by a stranger at knifepoint, she took two extraordinary and courageous steps. Firstly, she confronted him face to face after his conviction, as part of a programme known as “restorative justice”. Then she waived her anonymity, speaking of the decision she took to face the man who had attacked her. Now she is speaking out again, this time to voice her concerns at a parole system which could free Stephen Allen Gale early next year.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
'Why I must speak out to stop my rapist being freed'
from the article by David Barrett in the Telegraph: After Dr Claire Chung was raped by a stranger at knifepoint, she took two extraordinary and courageous steps. Firstly, she confronted him face to face after his conviction, as part of a programme known as “restorative justice”. Then she waived her anonymity, speaking of the decision she took to face the man who had attacked her. Now she is speaking out again, this time to voice her concerns at a parole system which could free Stephen Allen Gale early next year.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Non-formal education in the Middle East: Giving adolescents a second chance
from Curt Rhodes' article on unicef.org: In May 2005 violence exploded during a soccer game among students who had just enrolled in their town’s first NFE class. Angry over a lost goal, Humam kicked his younger teammate Ayman to the ground. This kind of violence early in the programme jeopardized the entire approach to alternative education. Ayman was a shy, defenseless boy. Other boys like him might feel threatened, and the safety of the learning environment might dissolve if violence went unchecked. The teaching facilitators decided that the violent incident would best be resolved by the students themselves ruling on justice for the harmed and a penalty for the offender. They announced a trial – with students taking the roles of judge, jury, prosecution and defense – and explained the legal process to the two boys and the other students.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB