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The Interrupters: A story of restorative justice
from the article by Josh Larsen on Capital Commentary: The interrupters program is based on the work of epidemiologist Gary Slutkin, who compares the spread of violence to the spread of infectious diseases. The interrupters try to stop the infection at its fountainhead, which is where Matthews lives—at the source.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
RJ Article Gordon, Diana R.. Deepening democracy through community dispute resolution: problems and prospects in South Africa and Chile.
Post-apartheid South Africa and post-Pinochet Chile have taken significant steps to democratize justice. This article acknowledges conventional reforms of both countries' criminal justice systems but focuses primarily on case studies of participatory and restorative initiatives that have attempted to expand the theory and practice of public safety practices in non-state settings. The experience of resolving interpersonal disputes in new democracies and what it means for the people who do it is examined. The research hypothesized that public participation in matters of justice and security can foster more active citizenship, a contribution to deepening democracy in countries in transition, as South Africa and Chile have been since the early 1990s. The experiences of the Community Peace Program and the Barrio Sin Violencia shed light on both the potential and the limitations of efforts to deepen democracy through community dispute resolution. They suggest that whether or not public participation in matters of justice and security fosters more active citizenship in democratizing countries depends on complex cultural and historical influences, including perspectives on sources of authority, institutional patterns of justice, and mutual trust.(excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
File Wright, Martin. Mobilizing the community for crime prevention.Paper to international conference on ‘The role of community restorative justice centres in the juvenile justice system’, Ukrainian Centre for Common Ground, Kyiv, 19-20 April 2007.
This paper will discuss some of these questions, and suggest the role of restorative justice in answering them. First it will consider restorative approaches in schools and in the community, and their contribution to the reduction of harm. Then it will consider how restorative justice can be used at various stages of the process when harm, or crime, has taken place, and the community’s role in this. Finally it will return to the question of prevention. (excerpt)
Located in Full-Text Documents at RJ Online
File Community justice: Not to you or for you, but with you
by Christa Pierpont. The “magic” of restorative practices comes from a principled belief that when there is a breach in relationships, people can re-story their lives (often in gifted ways), given an active and supported responsibility to do so. It is clear from the research report, Restorative Justice: The Evidence, (Lawrence W. Sherman and Heather Strang, Smith Institute, 2007) that individuals can transcend large and small wrongs in a highly satisfactory way with improved long-term consequences when restorative practices are used. Our next question was: Could this opportunity be expanded from individuals to a wider sense of cultural harms?
Located in Full-Text Documents at RJ Online
RJ Article Lustig, Eric A.. The Bhopal Disaster Approaches 25: Looking Back to Look Forward: Foreword
A discussion of the complexities of reparation in cases of corporate abuse and negligence, particularly illustrated by an event in Bhopal, India, when a Union Carbide plant exploded and severely impacted the slums nearby.
Located in articlesdb / articles
RJ Article Cooper, Davalene. The Bhopal Disaster Approaches 25: Looking Back to Look Forward: Thinking About Justice "Outside of the Box:" Could Restorative Justice Practices Create Justice for Victims of International Disasters?
Using the Union Carbide plant disaster in Bhopal, India, the author suggests how restorative justice practices, particularly the truth commission, could be implemented in events of corporate negligence and abuse.
Located in articlesdb / articles
Community justice: Not to you or for you, but with you
by Christa Pierpont. This is a selection of an article from a special online complement to the Summer 2008 issue of ACResolution, Vol 7, Issue 4. The Association for Conflict Resolution has given permission for it to be used on RJOnline. The complete article is attached. The “magic” of restorative practices comes from a principled belief that when there is a breach in relationships, people can re-story their lives (often in gifted ways), given an active and supported responsibility to do so. It is clear from the research report, Restorative Justice: The Evidence, (Lawrence W. Sherman and Heather Strang, Smith Institute, 2007) that individuals can transcend large and small wrongs in a highly satisfactory way with improved long-term consequences when restorative practices are used. Our next question was: Could this opportunity be expanded from individuals to a wider sense of cultural harms? In particular, could restorative processes begin to address underlying racial anger and fears in our region without exacerbating negative economic realities? These questions grew out of dynamics we were discovering as we explored the history of public school education in Virginia. When the RCF studied school disciplinary statistics for public schools, we found a significantly higher rate of disciplinary action for low-income and minority youth. Efforts are now being made to reduce out-of-classroom placements and to transition to more restorative disciplinary practices, but it will take decades and funding to re-build skills for individuals who have given up on the public school system.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
In Camden, young ex-offenders spread antiviolence message
from the article on philly.com: Wilson Rodriguez thought he had something worthwhile to say, but he wondered why a young audience would listen to a 21-year-old parolee convicted as a teenager in the bludgeoning death of a sleeping homeless man. He told more than a dozen youngsters in an event hosted by the Camden Board of Education he and his friends "did something horrible and someone ended up dying."
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Comment mariannesong on Retaking our streets: Restorative justice in the city of St. Francis
My daughter is a missing/murdered person.It happened in 2003.We have yet to find her remains. She is still a missing person. It is a terrible [...]
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB / Retaking our streets: Restorative justice in the city of St. Francis / ++conversation++default
RJ Article Roche, Declan. Governing ungoverned spaces: the role of one women’s group in Cali, Colombia
In Cali, Colombia, a group of women from the District of Aguablanca is helping to bring peace and justice to one of the country’s poorest and most violent turban areas. Using skills and information disseminated through a network of weekly meetings, local women assist local residents both by providing a range of essential services – from mediation to adult education – and by referring residents to other service providers and resources in the community. This group, which is strikingly community-based, female, well-led, disciplined, and holistic, is now being touted as a model for communities elsewhere in Colombia. Communities, policy-makers and restorative justice advocates – both in Colombia and abroad – can learn much from their approach to restorative justice, and more broadly, from their network-based approach to governing ungoverned spaces. Much of the debate about the conflict in Colombia focuses on national events and neglects the efforts of local communities to nurture peace and justice in their immediate environment. The Aguablanca program demonstrates that local initiatives can make a big difference in the lives of ordinary Colombians. To replicate the success of this program in communities elsewhere, however, it will be necessary to identify local citizens who can provide the same leadership and commitment as the women of Aguablanca. Author’s abstract.
Located in articlesdb / articles