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How we forgave my son's vicious killer: Parents whose teenage boy was beaten to death by thugs come face-to-face with offenders
from the article by Deborah Arthurs in the Daily Mail: In a meeting arranged by the Restorative Justice programme and mediators at the charity CALM (Confidential And Local Mediation), the couple met with two of the three perpetrators responsible for the crime when they came to the end of their sentences. And in a moment of heart-wrenching humanity that brings tears to the eyes, Ray says that when one of the offenders entered the room, all he wanted to do was hug him.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice & restorative mediation
from Julie Speer's blog entry: This past year I’ve had the good fortune of telling several stories related to restorative justice and restorative mediation. Colorado is leading the way with RJ (Restorative Justice), and has gotten a large grant from the Department of Justice to look at how using RJ can decrease the costs to the system. When offenders go through an RJ process, their rate of recidivism is astonishingly low!
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
File Bohland, Charlyn. 2008. Restorative Justice: A New Approach to Battling Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol. Honors Senior Research Project. University of Akron.
The reality of driving under the influence (DUI) is sobering. Over 17,000 people die each year as a result of preventable alcohol-related crashes. While 1.4 million people are arrested for DUI, there are nearly 159 million others who self-confess to DUI each year. Within three years of being arrested, three-fourths of offenders will be rearrested for DUI. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the predictable failure of current criminal justice standards, and the hope and promise of a new wave of justice – restorative. Restorative justice focuses on healing the injustice of the crime through direct person-to-person interaction in several different ways –community reparative boards, family conferences, mediations, and victim impact panels. Research is based on a relatively current compilation of national and international studies regarding DUI cases, criminal justice standards, and restorative justice initiatives. Finally, and most importantly, this project presents an adaptable model for dealing with drunken driving offenders, both first-time and repeat offenders, using restorative measures as an effective means of curbing the number of deaths, decreasing recidivism rates, and drastically reducing the number of DUI cases, all while restoring the victim, offender, and community to its original state before DUI tragedies occur.
Located in Full-Text Documents at RJ Online
RJ Article Goldstone, Sharon. Can Murder ever be Forgiven? A Restorative Justice Case Study.
For Christmas in 1985, Marlon* went to visit his daughter who was living with his ex-wife, her aunt and her four year old cousin, Tanya. Marlon went with the intention of giving both girls a Sindy doll as a Christmas present but the visit resulted in the murder of Tanya's mother in front of her eyes. Sharon Goldstone describes an exceptional restorative meeting in which Tanya and Marlon met for the first time in twenty-four years. (excerpt)
Located in articlesdb / articles
Angel Ruelas pleads guilty to murder of Pacific Grove teen
from the story by Virginia Hennessey for the Mercyr News: The brother of murder victim Kristopher Eric Olinger and the man who unexpectedly admitted killing the Monterey High School student hope to find some peace as part of the "restorative justice" program. Angel Ruelas' plea Tuesday was a stunning development that came nearly 15 years after Olinger's horrific murder, six years after the defendant's arrest and moments before a pool of prospective jurors were brought into the courtroom for trial.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
NPR: Victims confront offenders, face to face
from Laura Sullivan's interview with Sujatha Baliga on Talk of the Nation: BALIGA: Yes. And I said there's no chance. You know, this is not a case for restorative justice. The system is not amenable, particularly in your state. And I can't tell too many details, because we're still finishing things up with that case right now. It's not quite a done deal yet. But we're close. And the mother of this young man was so persistent and told me that she had actually been meeting with the girl's parents. She and her husband were meeting with the girl's parents, and that the girl's parents actually were the one interested in restorative justice. And she said, Can I give them your information? I said I'd be happy to talk to them and tell you the same thing I'm telling you, which is that this is not happening. (SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Can forgiveness play a role in criminal justice?
from the article by Paul Tullis in the New York Times ….Baliga laid out the ground rules: Campbell would read the charges and summarize the police and sheriff’s reports; next the Grosmaires would speak; then Conor; then the McBrides; and finally Foley, representing the community. No one was to interrupt. Baliga showed a picture of Ann, sticking out her tongue as she looks at the camera. If her parents heard anything Ann wouldn’t like, they would hold up the picture to silence the offending party. Everyone seemed to feel the weight of what was happening. “You could feel her there,” Conor told me.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Restorative justice for teens charged in jetski death
from the article in the New Zealand Herald: Family of Bishop Thompson, the teenager killed in a jetski accident near Rotorua in January, told a judge they never wanted to see the matter taken to court. Speaking at the invitation of Judge Chris McGuire in the Rotorua District Court this morning, family spokesman Mana Witoko said it supported the plan to have the two youths charged in connection with the death take part in a restorative justice programme.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
D.C. sniper speaks 10 years after violence: Can restorative justice apply here?
from the article by Lisa Rea on Restorative Justice International: It’s been 10 years since the D.C. sniper took 10 lives and wounded three. The following are two stories (including one audio tape) from Josh White of the Washington Post (September 29, 2012) interviewing Lee Boyd Malvo, the young killer who voluntarily did the bidding of John Allen Muhammad. Malvo and Muhammad went on a killing spree that lasted 23 days in October 2002 terrorizing the victims and their families and all who lived in the D.C. region. As we provide a link to these stories we think of the victims and the victims’ families. We also consider the words of Lee Boyd Malvo who tells his victims “to forget him.” Can restorative justice be applied here? Could the victims or their families choose restorative justice now in this case?
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB
Fairness, justice and restoring lives
from the article by Steven Teske on Juvenile Justice Information Exchange During a hot summer day, daycare workers removed children from a van, except one — Jazzmin Green. She was two years old. Sixteen-year-old Miesha Ridley was responsible for checking off the names of the children as they were removed. There was a mark next to Jazzmin’s name. An hour passed before anyone noticed she was missing. They found her in the van unconscious — still strapped to her car seat. She died from the heat. Miesha and two adult workers were arrested. Miesha admitted to voluntary manslaughter — it was time for disposition. Jazzmin’s parents made it clear that anything other than prison for Miesha would be “unfair.” They just buried their child and the pain was eating at them. During the hearing, Mr. Green shared these feelings of unfairness and asked that “justice” be done.
Located in Restorative Justice Online Blog -- RJOB